Osama bin Laden


On Sunday, May 1, 2011, U.S. troops and CIA operatives shot and killed Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad, Pakistan, a city of 500,000 people that houses a military base and a military academy. A gun battle broke out when the troops descended upon the building in which bin Laden was located, and bin Laden was shot in the head. News of bin Laden’s death brought cheers and a sense of relief worldwide.

“For over two decades, Bin Laden has been Al Qaeda’s leader and symbol,” said President Barack Obama in a televised speech. “The death of bin Laden marks the most significant achievement to date in our nation’s effort to defeat Al-Qaeda. But his death does not mark the end of our effort. There’s no doubt that Al-Qaeda will continue to pursue attacks against us. We must and we will remain vigilant at home and abroad.”

While Bin Laden’s demise was greeted with triumph in the United States and around the world, analysts expressed concern that Al-Qaeda may seek retaliation. U.S. embassies throughout the world were put on high alert, and the U.S. State Department issued a warning for travelers visiting dangerous countries, instructing them “to limit their travel outside of their homes and hotels and avoid mass gatherings and demonstrations.” Some Afghan officials expressed concern that bin Laden’s death might prompt the U.S. to withdraw troops from Afghanistan and said the U.S. should maintain a presence there because terrorism continues to plague the country and the region.

“The killing of Osama should not be seen as mission accomplished,” former interior minister Hanif Atmar told the New York Times. “Al Qaeda is much more than just Osama bin Laden.” Dr. Ayman al-Zawahiri, an Egyptian doctor who is al-Qaeda’s theological leader, will likely succeed bin Laden.

Read more: Osama bin Laden — Infoplease.com http://www.infoplease.com/spot/osamabinladen.html#ixzz1LEsRF94l

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: